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A major component in your home’s electrical system is the main electrical feed coming into the panel board. Between the utility wires and the panel board is the electric meter which is typically installed in a separate meter box, but sometimes they are installed in a panel board with a separate space for the meter. Meter boxes, also known as meter sockets, are often installed outside and mounted on the side of the home.
Published by Daniel Snyder 65 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Performing your own electrical repairs is satisfying, cost effective, and saves time. However working with household current puts you within reach of a lethal dose of electricity. According to a government report, about one person dies every week in a construction-related electrical accident. Before you attempt any type of electrical repair or installation, make sure that the power is off and label the circuit breaker so that no one inadvertently turns it on while you are working. Here are a few...
Published by Daniel Snyder 69 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Many people have switched to using compact fluorescent (CFL) lightbulbs to reduce energy usage, but the technology is still in its infancy and there have only been a few long-term studies conducted. One of the most recent studies comes from Stony Brook and New York State Stem Cell Science which suggests CFLs might cause damage to skin by releasing UV rays. Based on the research, scientists concluded that CFL lightbulbs can be harmful to healthy skin cells.
Published by Daniel Snyder 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
How to take a plain old light switch cover and turn it into a decorator plate cove to match the interior theme of a room or to match the decor. Sharpies have so many colors available now and you can take a basic light switch cover and turn it into a little piece of art in your room quite simply.
Published by Jaz 73 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
The high-voltage section of a commercial or domestic microwave oven consists of four basic components—the high-voltage oil-filled capacitor, the high-voltage rectifier, silicon diode, the high-voltage filament transformer, and the magnetron tube. The high-voltage section of the microwave oven is the section that fails most often so we should begin our troubling with the high-voltage components.
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Of all the appliance found in the average home, the microwave oven is the dangerous for the DIY electrician to troubleshoot and repair. The magnetron, the power source for the microwave oven operates at extreme high voltage, 4,000 to 5,000 volts DC is not uncommon. Even with the appliance unplugged from the wall receptacle, this deadly high-voltage may still be present on the high-voltage, oil-filled filter capacitor if the bleeder resistor has become defective or has not had time to drain off t...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
The Ohm's Law was named after the German physicist, Georg Ohm who first introduced the formula in 1827. In its most basic form the Ohms Law states that a current flowing in a circuit is directly proportional to the circuits voltage and varies inversely with the circuits resistance. In other words, double the voltage while keeping the resistance the same and the current will be doubled. On the other hand, double the resistance while keeping the voltage the same and the current will be reduced by ...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Electricity is a science, and electricians, like the practitioners of any science, have an argot all their own. An argot of pure esoterica, decipherable only by the initiate. But like most jargon, it is easy to learn if it's approached in a systematic manner. In the case of electrical terms of measurement, most of the units that you will need to be cognizant of build on a handful of basic units and it is those basic units that we will be discussing today.
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Electrical energy is produced by huge generators. These generator are powered by large turbines, turbines that receive their energy from water or steam. Steam for steam-powered turbine may be generated in oil, gas, or coal fired boilers, or from nuclear reactors. Understanding how electricity is produced and distributed to homes and businesses is the first step in becoming a knowledgeable DIY electrician. Back in the day when I first became interested in electricity and electronics, one of my fa...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
We are living in a wired world more so today than ever before and every mobile device comes with its own USB charger. All of these charger are alike in that they output 5.2 Volts DC (Direct Current) with a maximum 2000 mA load current (5.2 VDC at 2 Amperes) or 10.4 Watts. The problem with these USB chargers are that they are small and easily misplaced, or they become a tangled mess in a kitchen drawer. Newer Technology has solved that problem forever with their new, patented, Power2U AC/USB Wall...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
There are many different types of electrical tape being used today. There are low-voltage plastic tapes, high-voltage rubber tapes, and cloth, friction tapes, just to name a few of the many types available. As a DIY electrician, you will be dealing mostly with low-voltage wiring. When referring to classification of electrical tape, low-voltage refers to branch circuits with 120 or 240-Volts applied across them. For low-voltage wiring you will be mainly using Black, or colored, plastic electrical...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Do you have a branch circuit breaker that trips open intermittently? Do you have an Edison Base fuse that blows out intermittently? Then the chances are good that you have an overloaded branch circuit. There are a couple of ways you can determine if an over load exists on any given circuit. One way is to connect a recording clamp-on Watt meter or Ampere meter to the circuit in question and read the load present when the breaker trips open or the fuse blows. Recording meters are expensive and not...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Many older homes still have some knob & Tube wiring being used in their walls and ceilings. This old wiring is still acceptable as long as it is in good condition and has not been buried with blown-in insulation. The problem with K & B wiring was that it was installed without running a third-wire system grounding conductor, so there was no provisions for a machine safety ground. Another serious defect with K & B wiring system, which was the preferred wiring system beginning in 1880 right on up t...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
Electrical boxes (device boxes, outlet boxes, and junction boxes) are divided into two major types—“New Work” and “Old Work” boxes. “Old Work” boxes are also known as “Remodel Boxes” and “Retrofit Boxes”, either of which is more descriptive of how these boxes are used. Basically “New Work” boxes are reserved for use in new construction where the electrician still has access to the wall studs and ceiling rafters and is...
Published by Jerry Walch 74 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +0 votes | 0 comments
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