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One of the most basic electrical fixtures in your home is a floor or table lamp. If you ever have to rewire a broken lamp or socket, there are some important lamp socket wiring basics you need to understand to correctly connect hot and neutral wires when you replace a lamp switch and socket to keep your lamp safe. Most lamp cords and plugs have marking to identify the neutral wire. You should verify that your lamp is wired correctly especially if it is old or you purchased it second-hand.
Published by Daniel Snyder 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +8 votes | 1 comments
Power panel, service panel, distribution panel, or circuit breaker panel all refer to the same panel. It is the one place in the home electrical system where most DIY electricians fear to tread, because it is the only place where they will have to work around “Live” wiring. Still, it is a place that every electrician has to go every time he or she adds a new circuit to the home or when he or she has to change out a defective circuit breaker. The good news is that it really is not suc...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +4 votes | 2 comments
During the early days of electrification, Knob and Tube Wiring, commonly referred to as K & B Wiring in the trades, was one of the earliest standardized methods for installing electrical wiring. From the late 19th century to the early 20th century (1890 to about 1930), K & B Wiring was the preferred method for installing new wiring. During the early 1900s it was preferred to other wiring methods available—metal conduit systems and armored cable systems—because it was quicker and ea...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +2 votes | 1 comments
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter requirements first appeared in the 1971 Revision of the National Electrical Code. In 1971, the NEC made it mandatory that GFCI Protection be provided for swimming pools and all exterior receptacles. With each new Revision of the Code, the mandatory areas spread until, by the 2002 Revision of the Code, GFCI Protection became mandatory for swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, exterior receptacles, bathroom receptacles, garage receptacles, Hydro massage tubs, bath houses...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +2 votes | 0 comments
We are living in an energy conscious world today, more so than back in the day when I was growing up. The phrase “Living Green” is on everyone’s tongue. One way to conserve electrical energy and to live greener is to install dimmer switches, where there are standard, old fashioned, light switches that control incandescent lights. The operative words here are “Incandescent Lights.” Standard dimmers, either single-pole or 3-way, will not work with fluorescent lights....
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +3 votes | 0 comments
As a rule, the most difficult part of any DIY Electrical project is running the new wire. Fishing new cable through finished walls, ceilings, and floors can be a challenge even for the old pros. At best fishing wire is a laborious, time consuming activity. Over the years, the pros have learned a few new tricks that cut down on the time it takes to run new circuits in a finished room and I will share a couple of them—running your new wire behind baseboards and around door casing—in...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +6 votes | 3 comments
One of the most important things that every DIY Electrician needs to learn is how to select the right materials for the projects he or she is planning. Whether your projects passes or fails inspection depends on your being able to select the right size and type of wire for the circuit that you are installing. Not just any old wire will do. You could install a water heater circuit using AWG 12, solid-copper wire and it would work fine but it would not be safe, and it would not pass inspection. Us...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +6 votes | 3 comments
Just as replacing light switches is a common job that the DIY Electrician is called upon to, so is replacing duplex receptacles. Although receptacles have no true moving parts they do wear out with age. The constant insertion and removal of plugs weaken the contact tension and eventually they are unable to hold a plug securely in place. Being located near the floor or counter tops they are prone to be damaged when struck by a vacuum cleaner, furniture, appliances, etc. receptacles that no longer...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +6 votes | 0 comments
Rewiring a floor lamp or a table lamp is a great way for the new DIY Electrician to get some hands-on experience while working on a totally safe project. This project will teach you some essential skills i.e. the use of a simple continuity tester, how to test a lamp socket and switch for continuity, how to test a cord-set for continuity, and how to determine lamp cord polarization. These are skill sets that you will need when working on more advanced projects.
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +14 votes | 4 comments
Most DIY Electricians have no problem understanding how single-pole light switches work and they have no problem understanding how to connect them in a circuit, not so when it comes to 3-way and 4-way switches. Many DIY Electricians are confused about how these switches actually work and confused about how they should be interconnected. There really is not any mystery about how these switches function or in connecting them, as you will soon see.
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +9 votes | 4 comments
When installing new wiring, the electrician tries to route the wiring in such away as to keep the Home Runs, the cables coming from the service panel, as short as possible. There are two reasons for wanting to keep these wire runs as short as possible. First, copper wire is expensive and keeping the runs short reduces cost. Second, there is the issue of voltage drop. Keeping the wire as short as possible keeps the voltage drops down and all you need to know about voltage drops for now is that th...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +7 votes | 5 comments
One of the most common tasks that a DIY Electrician will be called upon to perform is replacing a defective light switch. A light switch has a simple task to perform, turning one or more lights on and off, but there is nothing simple about a light switch. There are basically three types of lights switches used in the home—a single pole light switch, a 3—way light switch, and a 4—way light switch. In this article you will learn how to identify each of those switch types as we...
Published by Jerry Walch 70 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +11 votes | 10 comments
Every year more than 1 million injuries occurs from falls on stairs. Stair mishaps rank as the second leading cause of accidents in the United States according to the National Safety Council. That makes the number of people injured in falls on stairs only second to the number injured in car accidents. Every year, 12 thousand people die as a result of falling on stairs, that is one fatality in every eighty-three falls. Half of all the fatal fall happen in the home.
Published by Jerry Walch 71 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +1 votes | 0 comments
Low voltage lighting transformers have become commonplace in many of todayÂ’s homes with the increase awareness in energy efficient lighting systems and decorative accent lighting. A low voltage lighting transformer is a device that converts the standard 110V or 120V household voltage to a lower voltage such as 24V or 12V. However, like any other electrical device, problems arise that need to be corrected to restore the system to a normal working state.
Published by Daniel Snyder 71 months ago in Electrical Systems & Lighting | +11 votes | 0 comments
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